//THAT'S DECK\\
Anything I Find Visually Fascinating
Home / Ask Me Anything / archive
Source : 30000fps

type-lover:

Study of the layout
by s s

(via giorkonducta)

Source : behance.net
Till 8PM PST

http://emsradio.la/

Till 8PM PST

http://emsradio.la/

Source : bingo2000
boyirl:

Post Modern LoversPhotography: by Delwin KamaraStyling: by TJ GustaveModel: Lucas Cristino @ Re:Quest

boyirl:

Post Modern Lovers

Photography: by Delwin Kamara
Styling: by TJ Gustave
Model: Lucas Cristino @ Re:Quest

(via uoa)

Source : boyirl
http://emsradio.la/
or
http://www.radioflag.com/stations/204037345#
Live now until 8pm
Get down with me ~

http://emsradio.la/

or

http://www.radioflag.com/stations/204037345#

Live now until 8pm

Get down with me ~

(via biscodeja-vu)

Source : biscodeja-vu
viersteshno:

Another new one

viersteshno:

Another new one

Source : viersteshno

(via themptynest)

Source : prostoslozhno

artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,Les Femmes D’Alger.

Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.

Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by theie countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”

"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)

(via diosaodiosa)

Source : artblackafrica